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Search for 'violent videogames' returned 3 results.

Judge Blocks California Anti-Violent Videogame Law
news | 12/28/05 | Shawn Rider
We reported back in October about an anti-violent videogame law passed by California legislators and signed by Governor Schwarzenegger, who has starred in enough violent videogames to know something about the matter. The legislation immediately sparked a lawsuit from the Entertainment Software Association, which argues that the law is both unnecessary and impedes the First Ammendment rights of minors. Yesterday a US District Judge Ronald Whyte issued an injunction against the law, citing the likelihood of the ESA winning its case to reverse the legislation, as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle.
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GF! Weekly Wrap-Up 8
podcast | 10/14/05 | Val Townsend
Val\'s back, and this week we have a podcast full of all the goods. We look at all the latest news, from the announcement of Peter Jackson as executive producer for the Halo movie to the Governator\'s attack on violent videogames. Tristan checks in with a review of Burnout: Revenge, and Aaron takes an early look at Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. It\'s seven solid minutes of audio goodness.
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IEMA Statement on California's New Anti-Violent Videogame Law
news | 10/12/05 | Shawn Rider
The Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association has released an official statement against a new California law signed into law yesterday by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who claims the law will \"require that violent video games be clearly labeled and not be sold to children under 18 years old.\" That\'s not a bad thing; in fact, games are already clearly labelled and rated for both age and content. And therein lies the problem: California\'s law does not recognize the ratings of the ESRB, and instead imposes a vague set of guidelines which retailers will be legally bound to. Needless to say, this puts retailers in a precarious position: In some way, every title must be separately re-rated in California, but the specifics of how that would work are not there. Click here to read more about the law and retailers\' statement against it.
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